Routes to Socialism 1: The October Revolution: Critiques and Analysis

Room: 
Room 2.30A, Law & Politics Building
Time Slot: 
Monday 26th March 14:15 - 15:45
Panel Chair: 
  • Professor Terrell Carver (University of Bristol)
Panel Members: 
  • Professor Mark Cowling (Teesside University)
  • Dr Paul Raekstad (University of Amsterdam)
  • Dr David Bates (Canterbury Christ Church University)

Convenors: Dr David Bates (Canterbury Christ Church University); Professor Mark Cowling (Teesside University).

Email: david.bates@canterbury.ac.uk

The question of how progress from capitalism to socialism might be achieved has been much debated.  The route originally charted by Marx and Engels was that of revolution, and October 1917 (old-style calendar) was the first of a whole series of socialist revolutions in the 20th century, the high tide of which came in the 1970s.  However, there are numerous questions about these revolutions which are still debated.  One is that it was widely assumed that a revolution in one country would be rapidly followed by revolutions in the other leading capitalist countries.  However, the only successful revolution which followed the Russian revolution at all rapidly was one in Mongolia.

Other issues concerning the Revolution to be discussed in this panel are ways in which it was flawed, and the fraught relations between Lenin and the anarchists.